Series 10

Twice the Emotions

Dec
30

Review of Twice Upon a Time
Warning: This review contains episode-specific spoilers and wild speculation about future episodes.

I am at such a weird crossroads of emotions, I hardly know where to begin. Capaldi's Twelfth Doctor has become my all-time favorite (just edging out the Eighth—sorry, Paul! I still love you!), so watching his regeneration story was even more bittersweet than usual. On the other hand, I'm eager to see Whittaker take the reins. Add in the other ups and downs along the way, and I'm just a mess.

As is often the case at the end of a modern Doctor's tenure, Twelve's last hurrah was full of looking back as much (if not more) than forward. We knew going in that he'd be sharing the spotlight with his first (sort of) incarnation, and I was okay with that. I was also okay—more than okay!—with Bill Potts making a return.

I'll be honest, though; it wasn't a whole long time after the release of the trailer that revealed Bill's return that I started thinking about how it might be possible. I never came anywhere close to being right (par for the course, with a Moffat episode), but I had enough difficulty concocting my own hypothesis that the Doctor's suspicions (and later, opinions) about her presence echoed mine. As a result, it was difficult for me to be as delighted by having Bill back as I wanted to be.

I was also oddly ambivalent about having the First Doctor on board. I had quite enjoyed An Adventure in Space and Time, so was rather looking forward to David Bradley's rendition. However, I didn't get quite the vibe from him that I have come to associate with One; some of that was obviously down to the writing.

Categories: 

It’s Happened Again

Dec
27

The Doctor is dead; long live the Doctor!

I have finally seen Twice Upon a Time, but am still busy digesting it (along with various Christmas goodies). Although by rights, my review should be up today, I’m treating my family time over the school holiday break as a priority. After the festivities die down, I’ll make time for my review, as I don’t want to post anything without giving it due thought.

So watch this space. You can expect my review in the next two or three days.

Thanks for reading, and may you have a happy holiday season!

Confession #113: I Like In-Doctor-nating Newbs

Aug
09

When I started writing this blog several years ago, I still considered myself a new fan. The original concept of the blog was to talk about the show—particularly the Classic/pre-Hiatus era—from the perspective of someone who'd only "discovered" it ~2.5 years before. It was also less common at that time to see women blogging about Who, so it seemed like a nice little niche I could carve out for myself in fandom writing.

Somewhere along the way, I seem to have morphed into something more akin to Old Guard. I'll certainly never have the same kind of cred as fans who grew up with the show in the UK, or even those here in the US who had to scramble for access via many-times-copied VHS tapes. (Along those lines, I'm really looking forward to the release of Red White and Who: The Story of Doctor Who in America by Steven Warren Hill et al., due out in less than two weeks.) However, I've noticed that as the show evolves and gains new young viewers, I have more in common with those long-term fans than the new.

I think that commonality has much to do with the fact that I am of an age with the fans who grew up with the show. As such, I relate to television in much the same way. Having been raised on 70's and 80's television, I don't find those periods of Doctor Who as foreign or off-putting as many fans of younger generations do. Nor does 60's Who seem as far out of my norm.

These are things I have to keep in mind when I want to introduce new people to our show. Depending on the kind of television the individual in question is used to, I might have to make different selections or give a different set of preparatory comments.

The general openness of a subject to the entire experiment is also important. For example, there is a big difference between a thirty-something fan who's seen all of modern/post-Hiatus Who and is interested in exploring more of the older Doctors; a twenty-something who came in with Smith's Eleven and doesn't really connect to Capaldi's older, crankier Twelve—and is pretty dubious about that whole black-and-white nonsense; and a pre-teen who mostly only knows about the show because their parent(s) watch. That necessary customization is part of the fun for me.

Categories: 

Reader Poll Roundup: Series Ten Edition

Jul
26

Every year when I examine the readers' reactions to the series's episodes, I have more data from previous years (S7, S8, S9) to compare and contrast, thus giving context to the current year's ratings. Because I eliminated the zero-star option in all of the Reader Polls this year, I won't be able to do an "apples to apples" analysis, but will do what I can with what I've got.

I'll begin, as usual, with the average (mean) ratings. For each episode, I multiplied any given star rating (e.g., 5 stars) by the number of votes it got, added the results, and divided that sum by the total number of votes. The relatively even-keeled results are below:

The Doctor Stands

Jul
05

Review of The Doctor Falls
Warning: This review contains episode-specific spoilers and wild speculation about future episodes.

The fact that I came out of this episode without a bad taste in my mouth pretty much makes it the best Moffat finale ever, as far as I'm concerned. Not to say that it was an over-the-top awesome episode—it was very good, though not great—but it didn't have the characteristic "tripped at the finish line" feeling I usually get from a Moffat two-part finale.

Coming off last week's gut-punch, I was truly worried about how Bill's story would be resolved. I honestly expected either full-on tragedy (as implied by the end of World Enough and Time) or something out of left field that left me squinting in puzzlement at the screen.

Frankly, I found a combination thereof most likely, e.g., a Frankenstein's monster replacement body in the same style that Nardole seems to have accumulated parts over his adventures (h/t to Verity! podcast for that thought). You can imagine my unease, then, when the first character we follow in the pre-credits sequence is a young Black girl; my first, disturbing thought was that she would end up providing the body that Bill's mind would eventually occupy. I cannot fully express my relief that such was not the case.

Given how focused I initially was on Bill, it's a testament to the execution of this plot that I didn't feel that everything else—and there was so much else!—was a mere distraction. With five main cast members, there was a lot to cover to keep them all relevant, and damned if Moffat didn't manage it.

Categories: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Series 10
Real Time Analytics